Glen Warner - Artworld Fine Art

Glen Warner

Artist Summary

Glen Warner’s  goal is to capture the charm and hidden beauty of Toronto’s older neighbourhoods, especially around Cabbagetown, Riverdale, Kensington Market, the Danforth, and Parkdale.  Primarily self-taught, Glen began drawing and painting at an early age.  Price Range: $450 – $2,400

Full Biography

Glen Warner’s artistic goal is to capture the charm and hidden beauty of Toronto’s older neighbourhoods. He is especially drawn to the backstreets and laneways around Cabbagetown, Riverdale, Yorkville, Kensington Market, the Danforth, Parkdale and Beaconsfield Village. “I love to paint rear views of houses that have somehow escaped the renovator’s hammer,” he says, “and I enjoy painting streetscapes in downtown neighbourhoods that remain today much as I remember them in my childhood.”

Primarily self-taught, Glen began to draw and paint at an early age. For many years he earned his living as an author and journalist. In addition to numerous articles on art published in magazines such as Maclean’s, Canadian Art, Toronto Life, Art Business News and the Financial Post, he wrote Building a Print Collection, a best selling guide to collecting original prints and fine art photography.

Glen draws inspiration from artists such as Lawren Harris and Albert Franck, who also painted Toronto houses in winter. He also admires A.J. Casson’s depictions of old houses in Ontario villages. In the 1980s Glen had the privilege of working with Mr. Casson on numerous fine art publications, and is greatly indebted to him for all his advice and encouragement.

Glen’s work has been featured at Artworld since 2003. Since then he has participated in numerous group shows with other Artworld artists. In 2009 he mounted a major one-man show at Artworld which included his painting Hockey Game Near Yonge and Eglinton, which was reproduced that year on the Hospital for Sick Children’s annual holiday/Christmas card.

Artist’s Statement

“I love to paint rear views of houses that have somehow escaped the renovator’s hammer,” he says, “and I enjoy painting streetscapes in downtown neighbourhoods that remain today much as I remember them in my childhood.”  Glen Warner